Here’s How Online Stores Change Prices Depending on How You Shop

Here’s How Online Stores Change Prices Depending on How You Shop

A team of researchers at Northeastern University recently analyzed how e-commerce sites tailor prices to specific shoppers based on their digital habits and demographics, such as their ZIP code. According to the study, presented last week at the Internet Measurement Conference in Vancouver, major e-commerce sites including Home Depot, Walmart, and Hotels.com list online prices that are all over the map, and in some cases, these prices are “personalized” to the behavior of particular shoppers, including whether they shop on a phone or on a desktop. Source: Online Stores Change Prices Depending on How You Shop. Here’s How | WIRED Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Invention of Sliced Bread

The Invention of Sliced Bread

On the surface, sliced bread seems pretty simple. But it didn’t come easily: it’s an invention that endured tremendous hardships, tragedy, and years of innovation before hitting the shelves in the 1920s. It even toughed out a government ban during World War II. And it began with a tenacious inventor named Otto. Source: The Invention of Sliced Bread Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Why we get hiccups and how to stop them

Why we get hiccups and how to stop them

Why do people hiccup anyway? Even scientists are a little bewildered by this. “We still don’t know what hiccups do, and our cure for them hasn’t improved since Plato,” says Robert Provine. He’s a neuroscientist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who studies the evolution of behavior, and he researched hiccupping extensively for his recent book Curious Behavior: Yawning, Laughing, Hiccupping, and Beyond. One problem, Provine notes, is that hiccups have been difficult to study: “You can’t just go into the lab and ask someone to hiccup for you.” That means the research that does exist typically concerns people with problematic hiccups that have generally been going on for days, weeks, or years. But even research on these people has gleaned many surprising facts about hiccups. Source: The mysterious science of hiccups: Why we get them and how to stop them – Vox . Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Invention of the Equals Sign

The ideas of algebra brought on the symbols, not the other way around. Robert Recorde had written the words “is equal to” almost two hundred times in his book Whetstone of Witte (1557) before noticing that he could easily “avoid the tedious repetition” of those three words by designing the symbol = to represent them. The initial incentive was the need to abbreviate, but once the equal symbol was in place, something else took over. The concise character of the symbol came with an unintended benefit: it enabled an unadorned picture in the brain that could facilitate comprehension. Source: The Invention of the Equals Sign | WIRED

A Brief History of the Straw

A Brief History of the Straw

Source: A Brief History of the Straw – Bon Appétit Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

How Technology has changed product placement

How Technology has changed product placement

With recent advances, companies can now use algorithms to digitally serve you unique product placements based on where you live, your age or your salary. It’s a creepy concept, but it could change advertising forever. As Swedish DJ Avicii nonchalantly wanders into Stockholm’s Tele2 Arena, the music video of his hit “Lay me Down” starts. As he strolls past the venue’s reception; a Grand Marnier poster gets some vital screen time. Everywhere else in the world, the brand is never seen — a plain wall lies in its place. It’s one of the first examples of a new kind of temporary product placement called “digital insertion.” Source: Technology changed product placement (and you didn’t even notice) Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Difference Between Semi-, Hemi- & Demi-

The Difference Between Semi-, Hemi- & Demi-

English has a number of prefixes that come from the concept of “half.” Why do we have so many? And what’s the difference between them? Source: Semi-, Hemi-, Demi-: What’s the Difference? | Mental Floss Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Creating Engaged Brand Evangelists with Social Media

Creating Engaged Brand Evangelists with Social Media

For nearly 10 years, social media has been in the spotlight and, at the same time, a thorn in the side of many companies. Retailers in particular are constantly reminded of social media’s influence. Instead of steeping themselves in expert tips and hacks, companies would be wise step back and remember what’s at the core of the social interaction: Social platforms are merely tools for achieving a higher goal, which is creating an engaged customer base of brand evangelists. Source: Fashioning a Memorable Retail Experience That People Will Share – Yahoo Finance Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Is Your Retail Staff Ready For Digital

Is Your Retail Staff Ready For Digital

Retail staff in stores will have to change how they work as more shops begin to roll out digital solutions in their stores, leading directors in retail have said. As part of a seamless customer experience, retailers are trying to implement omnichannel solutions to tie up their online, mobile and in-store offerings. When digital solutions hit the shop floor, the existing shop assistants will have to be retrained and learn how to get the most out of the new tools, which may be complicated. Source: Retail staff will have to change as digital strategies take over Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Can Department Stores Regain Their Relevance?

Can Department Stores Regain Their Relevance?

In the heyday of department stores, fashionable ladies flocked to luxury emporiums like Le Bon Marché, Bergdorf Goodman, Saks Fifth Avenue and Selfridges. Department stores were wondrous and bright communal playgrounds, places to socialise and explore the seemingly endless stock of goods, often from far-flung locales. In the fight for consumer dollars, department stores have lost significant ground to monobrand stores, specialty retailers and e-commerce players. Can they regain their relevance? Source: Reinventing The Department Store – BoF – The Business of Fashion Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

The Grocery Shrink Ray: Quietly Stealing Our Food For Decades

The Grocery Shrink Ray is what we call it when the manufacturers of food and consumer goods make their products smaller––sometimes almost imperceptibly smaller––rather than raise prices. You know what it looks like: it’s why your toilet paper doesn’t quite fill the holder anymore, and why you don’t get as many servings of hot chocolate as you used to. We know that it’s been in action for decades, but is there proof? Yes: one need only turn to collectors of consumer ephemera like boxes and cans. Source: The Grocery Shrink Ray: Quietly Stealing Our Food For Decades – Consumerist Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us

Americans Have Been Cursing at Automated Checkouts Since 1937

Americans Have Been Cursing at Automated Checkouts Since 1937

Who enjoys struggling with microscopic barcodes and unmarked bits of produce in the self-checkout lane? Nobody? Too bad; self-automated modules are here to stay. With a few exceptions, virtually every new grocery store in America is asking consumers to do a bit of work at the end of their trip, reducing face-to-face interaction with employees and, theoretically, overhead costs. Self-checkout feels like a product of the disconnected Internet age, but in fact, the concept is nearly 80 years old. Next time you openly swear at a fritzing scanner, direct the sentiment at Clarence Saunders. Born 1881 to a Virginia tobacco farmer, Saunders spent a lifetime grasping for heights of shopping automation even greater than we know today, then falling and bootstrapping himself back up again and again. Source: Americans Have Been Cursing at Automated Checkouts Since 1937 – CityLab Rights to all content (text, images, videos etc.) with post source. If you think these are wrongly attributed email us